Team

Michael ZĂŒrn (Spokesperson)

© David Ausserhofer

Michael ZĂŒrn is Director of the Global Governance unit at the Berlin Social Science Center (WZB) and Professor of Political Science at the Free University of Berlin since 2004. He was founding Dean of the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin (2004–2009). Previously, he was Professor of International Relations at the University of Bremen, as well as Director of the Institute for Intercultural and International Studies. Between 2002 and 2004, he was Director of the Collaborative Research Center ‘Transformations of the State’ at the University of Bremen. He is a member of the Berlin–Brandenburg Academy of Science and of the Academia Europaea. He has – among other themes – most extensively written on the emergence and functioning of inter- and supranational institutions, as well as on the normative tensions and political conflicts that these developments unfold. He is author of numerous monographs and anthologies, and has published various articles in International Organization, World Politics, International Studies Quarterly, Global Policy, International Theory, Journal of Common Market Studies, West European Politics, Politics, Politische Vierteljahresschrift, Zeitschrift fĂŒr Internationale Beziehungen, and Leviathan, among others.

Hannah Birkenkötter

© Forschungsprojekt Verfassungsblog / Maurice Weiss, Ostkreuz

Hannah Birkenkötter, LL.M., is a research assistant at Humboldt-UniversitĂ€t zu Berlin at the Chair for Public Law and Jurisprudence (Prof. Dr. Christoph Möllers, LL.M.). She holds a double masters degree in law from the Universities of Cologne (Germany) and Paris I – PanthĂ©on-Sorbonne (France) and completed her legal studies at Humboldt-UniversitĂ€t zu Berlin. After her legal training (Referendariat) in Berlin, including training with the German Ministry of Foreign Affairs, an immigration law NGO in Paris and at the Appeals Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, she worked on a research project at Verfassungsblog before embarking on her dissertation. Her research interests include public international law with a focus on international institutional law, particularly the United Nations System, questions of international legal theory and international human rights law. She was a Visiting Student Research Collaborator at Princeton University in September 2014 and a Visiting Doctoral Researcher at New York University School of Law for the academic year 2016-2017.

Francesco Corradini

Francesco Corradini is a doctoral student enrolled in the Phd programme in International Law at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. Before his admission to the Phd programme, he obtained a Master’s degree in International Law from the Graduate Institute (2016) and a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science and International Relations from the University of Padua (2011). During his studies, he spent six months as an exchange student at the Law Faculty of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and nine months as an Erasmus student at the Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences at the University of Geneva. His research interests include the distributive role of law, the history of ideas and the sociology of law. In his current research project, he studies the role of law, from a legal pluralism perspective, in the making of global political economy with a focus on the empirical case of financial markets and institutions. He is proficient in English, French, Italian and has working knowledge of Spanish and Portuguese.

Daniëlle Flonk

DaniĂ«lle Flonk is a doctoral candidate and research associate with a focus on content control in the research project ‘Evolving Internet Interfaces: Content Control and Privacy Protection’. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science (2010-2013) and a Master’s degree (with Distinction) in International Relations (2013-2015) from the Radboud University in the Netherlands. She wrote her Master’s thesis on voting behavior within the United Nations Security Council, and was shortlisted for the DaniĂ«l Heinsius Thesis Prize 2016 (prize for the best Political Science Master’s thesis of The Netherlands and Flanders). After her graduation, she worked at the European Economic and Social Committee in Brussels (2015-2016) and as a lecturer at the Political Science department at the Radboud University in the Netherlands (2016-2017). Her research interests include international relations with a focus on norm development, cyber security, and international organizations. In her research, she analyzes interface conflicts in transnational internet governance. More specifically, her research is on government control over internet and cyberspace, and on international norm emergence with regard to cybercrime.

Julia Fuß

Julia Fuß is a doctoral candidate and research fellow in the research project ‘Responses to Interface Conflicts: How Spheres of Authority Handle Conflicting Rules’. Before joining the Global Governance unit of the WZB, she obtained a double degree in the Research Master European Studies (M.Sc.) at Maastricht University and Political Science (M.A.) at the University of Cologne. Already during her Bachelor studies in political science at the University of Mannheim, her research interests centred around issues concerning the EU Common Foreign and Security Policy. Expanding these interests into the wider field of international relations, her Master thesis examines the impact of third countries’ domestic conditions on the EU’s likelihood to issue restrictive actions and operations to draw conclusions on the EU’s role in world politics. Further research interests include processes of norm diffusion in the international system and states’ commitments to international norms in the field of international security relations. Her work experience includes several positions as a research assistant at the Mannheim Centre for European Social Research (MZES), the Cologne Center for Comparative Politics (CCCP) and in a NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) project at Maastricht University.

Anna Geis

© Stefan Berger

Anna Geis is Professor of Political Science, especially International Security and Conflict Studies, at the Helmut Schmidt University in Hamburg (since April 2016). From 2012-2016, she was Professor of International Relations at the University of Magdeburg. Before that, she had been appointed several times as Acting Professor at political science departments of the Goethe University in Frankfurt and of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich. She studied political science, history and German studies at the University of Darmstadt/Germany and the University of Warwick/UK. From 1999 to 2002 she worked as research associate at the Department of Political Science of the University of Hamburg, where she received her PhD in 2002 with a thesis on the Frankfurt Airport mediation process. From 2002 to 2009 she was a senior researcher and project director at the Peace Research Institute Frankfurt (PRIF) where she co-directed a comparative research project on ‘democratic wars’ and liberal interventionism. From 2009-2012 she was a senior researcher in the Cluster of Excellence ‘The Formation of Normative Orders’ at Goethe University Frankfurt. In 2012 she obtained her ‘habilitation’ from the Department of Social Sciences of the University of Frankfurt.

Sassan Gholiagha

Sassan Gholiagha is research fellow at the WZB Berlin and will work in the COLLISIONS project. He studied political science and sociology in OsnabrĂŒck, Germany. Here he obtained a B.A. in Social Science and a M.A. in Democratic Governance and Civil Society. He also holds an M.A. in Diplomacy, Law and Global Change from Coventry University, United Kingdom. From 2010 to 2016 he was the Managing Editor of Global ConstitutionalismHuman Rights, Democracy and the Rule of Law. During that time he also worked as a researcher at the Chair of Political Science, especially Global Governance at the University of Hamburg. In August 2016 he graduated with a PhD in political science from the University of Hamburg, with a dissertation entitled „The Humanization of international relations – Prosecution, Protection, and Killing“. Following parental leave, he worked from February 2017 until June 2017 as a post-doctoral researcher at the Institute of Political Science at the University of Hamburg. His work has been published in The International Journal of Human Rights, the Journal of International Political Theory, BEHEMOTH – A Journal on Civilisation, and the Zeitschrift fĂŒr Internationale Beziehungen (co-authored publication). He is one of the four speakers of the Thematic Group on IR Norms Research in the German Political Science Association. He has worked on the Responsibility to Protect, drones and their use in targeted killing operations, and International Criminal Law with a focus on the International Criminal Court. His research focuses on norms in international relations and International Relations Theory, International Law, Constructivism, Feminism, and intepretivist methodology.

Anna Holzscheiter

Anna Holzscheiter has been Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Relations at the Otto-Suhr-Institute for Political Science since April 2015. From 2014 to 2015 she was John F. Kennedy Memorial Fellow at the Center for European Studies, Harvard University. Since April 2015, she is the Head of the Junior Research Group “Governance for Global Health”, which has been established jointly by Freie UniversitĂ€t Berlin and the WZB Berlin Social Science Centre Berlin. From July 2006 until March 2015, Anna Holzscheiter was Research Associate at the Center for Transnational Relations, Foreign and Security Policy. Between August 2007 and October 2010 she was Visiting Research Fellow at the Department of Public Health Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, funded through a scholarship by the German Research Council (DFG). Since 2003, she has repeatedly worked as a consultant for UNICEF (Florence, Geneva) and the German Institute of Human Rights.

Markus Jachtenfuchs

© Hertie School of Governance

Markus Jachtenfuchs is Professor of European and Global Governance at the Hertie School of Governance. He teaches European and Global Governance. After studying political science in Mainz, Paris, Berlin and Bruges, he received his PhD from the European University Institute in Florence in 1994. He worked at the Mannheim Centre for European Social Research (MZES) and completed his post-doctoral thesis at the University of Mannheim in 1999. Before joining the Hertie School of Governance in 2006 he was Visiting Professor at the University of Greifswald and Professor of Political Science at Jacobs University Bremen. In 2010, he was the Pierre Keller Visiting Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs.

Stephanie JĂ€nsch

Stephanie JĂ€nsch currently works as a research associate in the OSAIC sub-project Management of Interface Conflicts in African Security Governance at the Helmut Schmidt University (HSU) in Hamburg. She holds an interdisciplinary Bachelor in “Culture and Society of Africa” from the University of Bayreuth (Germany) and a Master of Political Science from the University of Hamburg (Germany). Stephanie worked, amongst others, as an undergraduate assistant at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Studies (IFSH) in Hamburg. In 2017 she joined the OSAIC sub-project at the HSU, in which she worked as an undergraduate assistant at first. After finishing her master thesis on Tanzania’s non-military interpretation of “non-indifference” in Somalia, she joined the OSAIC sub-project as a research associate in May 2020. Besides this, she is a volunteer member of the interdisciplinary “Peacebuilding”-initiative at the University of Hamburg and published a book review for the University’s blog “100×100”. Her research interests include African agencies in peace and security, peacebuilding and conflict transformation in Africa as well as critical norm research.

Berkan Kaya

Berkan Kaya is a research fellow at the Humboldt-University Berlin at the Chair for Public Law and Jurisprudence (Prof. Dr. Christoph Möllers, LL.M.). He studied law at the Hamburg University and the Istanbul University. During his studies he worked as a research assistant at the Chair for Public Law, International Law and Global Constitutionalism (Prof. Dr. Nora Markard, MA). He was a member of the Refugee Law Clinic Hamburg where he participated in the exchange with the Columbia Law School and the International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP). His research interests include international law, human rights, constitutional law and legal theory.

Christian Kreuder–Sonnen

© David Ausserhofer

Christian Kreuder-Sonnen is assistant professor (with tenure track) of political science and international organizations at Friedrich Schiller University Jena. He is the co-director of the MA International Organizations and Crisis Management (IOCM). As a postdoc, Christian conducted OSAIC’s Z-project while being a research fellow in the Global Governance department of the WZB Berlin Social Science Center. After completing the BTS program, he received his PhD from the Free University Berlin in 2016. He held visiting positions at Nuffield College, Oxford University, and the Center for European Studies, Harvard University. His PhD thesis “Emergency Powers of International Organizations” was published in 2019 by Oxford University Press. It was awarded the 2020 Chadwick Alger Prize by the International Studies Association for the best book on the subject of international organization and multilateralism.

Nico Krisch

Nico Krisch is a professor of international law at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. His work focuses on the legal structure of global governance, the politics of international law, and the postnational legal order emerging at the intersection of domestic, transnational and international law. He is also the coordinator of the Global Governance research programme at the Institut Barcelona d’Estudis Internacionals (IBEI), a research professor of the Catalan Institution for Advanced Studies (on leave), and a fellow of the Hertie School of Governance, Berlin. He is also a member of the Council of the International Society of Public Law. Previously, he held faculty positions at the the London School of Economics and the Hertie School of Governance, was a visiting professor at Harvard Law School, and held research fellowships at Merton College, Oxford, at New York University Law School, and at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg. He holds a PhD in law from the University of Heidelberg, and his 2010 book, Beyond Constitutionalism: The Pluralist Structure of Postnational Law (OUP), was awarded the Certificate of Merit of the American Society of International Law.

Andrea Liese

Andrea Liese holds the chair of International Organizations and Policies since 2010. Her main research interests are international institutions and norms, international organizations, transnational human rights and development politics as well as governance in areas of limited statehood. She is principal investigator of the subproject D8 „Talk and Action. How International Organizations Respond to Areas of Limited Statehood“, which is part of the German Research Foundation sponsored research program (SFB 700) on „Governance in Areas of Limited Statehood.“ She also leads (together with Dr. Per-Olof Busch) the subproject 6 „Consideration of Expert Knowledge – International Public Administrations as Policy Experts“, which is part of the German Research Foundation group 1745. Furthermore, she is member of the research group  „The International Rule of Law – Rise or Decline?“, funded by the German Research Foundation. Andrea Liese is member of the research advisory board of the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP) as well as member of the advisory board of the journal „Zeitschrift fĂŒr Internationale Beziehungen“ (ZIB).

Christoph Möllers

© Maurice Weiss – Agentur Ostkreuz

Christoph Möllers, Dr. jur. (Munich), LL.M. (Chicago) is a Professor of Public Law and Jurisprudence, Faculty of Law, Humboldt-University Berlin. He was a Fellow at NYU School of Law and at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. He is a member of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences. Since January 2011 he has acted as a judge at the Superior Administrative Court in Berlin. Since April 2012 he is a Permanent Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study. His main interests include German, European and comparative constitu­tional law, regulated industries, democratic theory in public law, and the theory of normativity.

Tomáơ Morochovič

Tomáơ Morochovič is a doctoral candidate and research assistant in the International Law Department at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in Law from King’s College London (2015) and a Master’s degree in International Human Rights Law (with Distinction) from the University of Exeter (2017). Before embarking on his PhD, Tomáơ worked as a junior associate at White & Case and as a research assistant to Prof. Kubo Mačák. He was involved as a researcher and peer reviewer in the project International Cyber Law in Practice. His PhD research, under the supervision of Prof. Andrew Clapham, focuses on the role of narrativity in the development of human rights obligations of non-state actors, particularly in areas perceived as on the margins of international law. His other research interests include transnational legal theory, interaction between human rights law and other areas of international law, and the role of international law in cybersecurity.

Anke Obendiek

© Tristan Heß

Anke Obendiek is a doctoral candidate and research associate focusing on privacy protection within the sub-project „Evolving Internet Interfaces: Content Control and Privacy Protection“. She studied Political Science in Edinburgh, Hamburg and Oslo before focusing on International Relations Theory. During her master’s studies at the London School of Economics and Political Science she was Member of the Editorial Board at Millennium: Journal of International Studies, a peer-reviewed journal edited completely by postgraduate students. During her studies, she received a scholarship from the German National Merit Foundation. She has gained practical experiences working, amongst others, for the German Federal Foreign Office, the German Institute of Global and Area Studies and Wikimedia Deutschland. Her research interests include International Organizations, norms in International Relations and feminist approaches to security.

Christian Opitz

Christian Opitz is a post-doctoral researcher at the Helmut Schmidt University (HSU) in Hamburg. He holds a Master of Social Science from Uppsala University (Sweden) and a PhD from the University of Jena (Germany). Christian worked, amongst others, at the Center for International Peace Operations (ZIF), the German Federal Foreign Office, and the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP) before joining the HSU in 2018. After conducting research as part of a HSU project on “Civic Participation in Foreign and Security Policy”, he now works on the OSAIC sub-project Management of Interface Conflicts in African Security Governance. His research interests include the intersection of political science and organisation research (particularly regarding informal politics) as well as the development of democratic systems by involving ordinary citizens in political processes.

Lucy Lu Reimers

Lucy Lu Reimers is a doctoral candidate and teaching assistant at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, assisting the courses corporate responsibility in transnational and international law, private international law, international environmental law and policy, and current issues in the law and practice of the United Nations. She holds a Master’s degree in international law from the Graduate Institute (2012-2014) and a Bachelor’s in Political Science and Law from the Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich. Prior to her doctoral studies, she worked at the International Labour Organisation focusing on the responsibilities of lead companies along global supply chains as well as on decent work and sustainability issues in the extractives sector. Her PhD thesis is on the topic of tackling demand-driven environmental harm from an international law perspective. She is particularly interested in the intersections between international environmental-, human rights-, and economic law.

Andrés Saravia

AndrĂ©s Saravia is a research fellow in the Global Governance unit of the WZB and supports the coordination of OSAIC (Z-Project). He studied political science, sociology and economics in Berlin, London and Buenos Aires and holds a master’s degree in International Relations from the Free University Berlin, Humboldt-University Berlin and University Potsdam. Before joining WZB, he worked and interned at GIZ, the Hertie School, the European Parliament, the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP), the German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA) and the German Federal Foreign Office. His research interests include global governance, Latin American politics, European trade and development policies and social inequalities.

Linda Schneider

Linda Schneider, LL.B., was part of the OSAIC research group until November 2019. She is a research assistant at Humboldt-UniversitĂ€t zu Berlin at the Chair for Public Law and Jurisprudence (Prof. Dr. Christoph Möllers, LL.M.). She studied law in Potsdam and Paris and holds a Bachelor degree in law from the UniversitĂ© Paris Ouest-Nanterre-La DĂ©fense (France). Her university degree has been awarded with the University of PotsdamÂŽs Wolf-RĂŒdiger-Bub-Award. She finished her legal training (Referendariat) in 2015 in Berlin. She is a Doctoral Fellow in the post graduate program „Unity and Diversity in the European Legal Area“ of the Humboldt-UniversityÂŽs European Law School. Her research interests focus on the development of Jurisprudence in a national, European and transnational context, especially the practices of the German Federal Constitutional Court, the European Court of Justice and the European Court of Human Rights.

Lena Schumacher

Lena Schumacher is a doctoral candidate and research associate in the project ‘Management of Interface Conflicts in African Security Governance’ at the Helmut-Schmidt-University in Hamburg. She holds a Bachelor Degree in Political Science (2008-2011) and a Master’s Degree (with distinction) in Peace and Conflict Studies (2011-2014). She wrote her Master thesis on the relations and normative conflicts between the African Union and the International Criminal Court. After her graduation Lena Schumacher worked for the German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA) and gained experience in international development cooperation in South Sudan, Uganda and Iraq, where she worked as Program Coordinator for the Deutsche Welthungerhilfe. Back in research, her focus includes regionalism, peace-keeping and intrastate conflicts in Sub-Saharan Africa as well as norm conflicts and security governance.

Louise Wiuff Moe

Louise Wiuff Moe was a postdoctoral researcher at the Helmut Schmidt University, Hamburg until 31 March 2020. She holds a MA from the University of Stellenbosch and a PhD from the University of Queensland (2015). After completing her PhD she worked as a researcher at the Peace, Risk and Violence unit at the Danish Institute for International Studies until she in July 2017 joined the Helmut Schmidt University, where she was working on the OSAIC sub-project Management of Interface Conflicts in African Security Governance.  Louise’s research combines theoretical and empirical perspectives, and centres on security governance, peacebuilding and liberal interventionism, with a particular regional focus on Africa. Since April 2020 she is a research associate at the Cluster of Excellence „Climate, Climatic Change and Society“ of the University of Hamburg.